This I Believe: NEW KIND OF RELATIONSHIP

This I Believe: NEW KIND OF RELATIONSHIP

This past semester in English 11, Mrs. Dani DeJong shared a collection of essays from National Public Radio’s program, “This I Believe.” She then challenged her students to write their own personal credo about a core principle that defines their life. The array of topics, concerns, and passions were as diverse as the students themselves.

The ACS Inside Out blog is excited to present their essays in our 2017 summer blog series, “This I Believe: Eight Personal Credos by Eight ACS Students.”

PART EIGHT:  New Kind of Relationship

By Evan Franklin

Growing up, have you ever felt lonely? You know you aren’t “alone,” but it’s that feeling that nobody understands, listens or cares about who you are, what you think or what you do. Everybody has gone through this at least once in their life, some more than others.

But how do people deal with this?

Pen Pals

With the invention of the personal computer, the invention of electronic mail came to be and slowly over the years a new form of communication and relationships were formed. This became known as online friends (also known as “pen pals” depending on who you ask).

I was talking to one of my internet friends; it was just a normal friendly conversation, when his mom walked in and asked what he was doing. He said he was just talking to one of his friends.

I remember hearing her say, “A friend is somebody you see at the bus stop, not somebody you talk to through a computer screen.”

Over the years I’ve seen more and more parents and adults, still thinking that every online interaction could be an episode of Dateline NBC, where Chris Hansen is going to ask you to “take a seat.”

Friends Anywhere

I’ve never understood the problem people have had with online friends.

For years, I’d get home, hop onto my computer, and there’s where I’d have my human interaction for the day. I had interests that weren’t commonly shared, my “friends” weren’t good people and it wasn’t easy to connect with others.

Over the years, I’ve talked to so many people online and formed these strong friendships all over the world that have really helped me during the lonelier times in life. Whether it was just playing games, or talking about life, to giving each other tips on drawing. It’s the same thing as keeping up with an old friend on Facebook. You aren’t going to see each other in person, but you can still talk face to face with a webcam, or listen to each other through a phone. You’re just taking out that initial “touch” aspect, which although can be nice, doesn’t make or break a relationship.

Face to Face

During spring break, I had the honour of meeting one of my online friends in person! Although it was incredibly weird at first, we ended up having the exact same conversations, arguments, and jokes as the ones we had over a Skype call. The only difference was it being in person, instead of a screen.

So was there any real difference in our relationship? No.

We shouldn’t be putting barriers on what a friendship is and isn’t. A friendship is simply two people that enjoy each other’s company.

Does it matter how the two communicate? I’d say, it really doesn’t.

A friend is a friend at the end of the day, and that isn’t defined if it’s in person or through a screen.

This I Believe: THE JANITOR

This past semester in English 11, Mrs. Dani DeJong shared a collection of essays from National Public Radio’s program, “This I Believe.” She then challenged her students to write their own personal credo about a core principle that defines their life. The array of topics, concerns, and passions were as diverse as the students themselves.

The ACS Inside Out blog is excited to present their essays in our 2017 summer blog series, “This I Believe: Eight Personal Credos by Eight ACS Students.”

PART SEVEN: The Janitor

By Tyler Hiebert

One night I was walking home from the corner store with my friend and we were quite far from home. We were hoping to get a ride home, but realized neither one of us had a phone. We knew that we were close to my school.

As we got closer, we noticed some lights were on and the janitor was inside cleaning.

We decided to knock and see if he would let us in and use the phone. We were really hoping he would hear us. Thankfully he heard us and he was nice enough to let us in. We explained what was going on and he let us borrow the phone to call my friend’s dad to pick us up.

We were very thankful for the super, nice janitor.

A janitor may not have the most glamourous job, like the CEO of a big company, but I have learned that they deserve our respect just the same. Without them, none of us could do our jobs properly.

We need to respect everyone, from the highest positions in careers and down to the lowliest of jobs.

So the next time you see a janitor, make sure to thank them because not many people want or can do the things they do.

Everyone from big company CEO’s to janitors should be treated the same, this I believe. 

This I Believe: SAYING GOODBYE

This past semester in English 11, Mrs. Dani DeJong shared a collection of essays from National Public Radio’s program, “This I Believe.” She then challenged her students to write their own personal credo about a core principle that defines their life. The array of topics, concerns, and passions were as diverse as the students themselves.

The ACS Inside Out blog is excited to present their essays in our 2017 summer blog series, “This I Believe: Eight Personal Credos by Eight ACS Students.”

PART SIX: Saying Goodbye

By Jewel Haak

Have you ever missed the chance to say goodbye?

Goodbye has so many contexts, for an hour, a day, a long time, until eternity or forever. When you’re just saying goodbye for a little while it may seem ridiculous, or maybe you’re in a rush and just want to mutter out a quick goodbye and get to whatever it is you have to do, or maybe you are mad at the person and don’t want to take the time for them.

How will you feel though when the world is spinning and caving in because you never got the chance to say goodbye:

I was gonna see them in an hour, it didn’t seem necessary.

I was busy, I didn’t even get a hug…

The last thing I said was I hate you…

There are more benefits to saying goodbye than not regretting it though. When you’re busy and people are buzzing and moving all around you, it’s calming and grounding to take a minute to give a proper goodbye to someone. Not to mention when you yell goodbye across the room, you run the risk of the other person feeling less important than whatever it is you are doing.

If you still can’t relate, then think about past friendships, the ones ended with spiteful words and the reason you avoid hallways or places because if you run into them, you just know you’ll die. The friendships that have no hope of reconciliation because the last words were said out of hate and not love. The friendships that you are lying awake at night wondering what went wrong and where you stand, and the friendships that just seem to be on pause because it’s been two years.

What about any of these, but with the word relationship instead?

I have hurt people by rushing a goodbye, I’ve been hurt by a rushed goodbye; sure it doesn’t last long but if it’s preventable then, why do it? I have had friendships that just kind of dropped and I have people I never got a chance to say goodbye to and it hurts.

I have come to realize that life is unknown and the future isn’t promised, I don’t let this scare me too much. I try to make sure to say a proper goodbye and make sure people know I love them every time.

The future isn’t promised and the past can’t be changed.

You can’t take back words, and you can’t go back in time to say them. You never know what’s going to happen, or where you’re going to be.

This is why I believe you need to always take the time to say goodbye.

This I Believe: HELP OLD LADIES CROSS THE STREET

This past semester in English 11, Mrs. Dani DeJong shared a collection of essays from National Public Radio’s program, “This I Believe.” She then challenged her students to write their own personal credo about a core principle that defines their life. The array of topics, concerns, and passions were as diverse as the students themselves.

The ACS Inside Out blog is excited to present their essays in our 2017 summer blog series, “This I Believe: Eight Personal Credos by Eight ACS Students.”

PART FIVE: Help Old Ladies Cross The Street

By Daniela Estebanez

I believe that people should help old ladies cross the street.

I think almost everyone has been in a situation where they are in a hurry and there is always that old lady that is making everyone late. Sometimes this old lady can be waiting in line at a fast food restaurant, at the bank or crossing the street.

What usually happens next is that we start to get mad and frustrated.

We just want that old lady to hurry up because we have important things to do.

In the middle of all those thoughts we tend to forget how old she actually is. Maybe if we took a second to stop and think we would realize that she is doing the best she can. Instead of getting upset or frustrated we should take a few minutes to help her out.

By doing so, we are not only showing patience; we are showing kindness, compassion and empathy.

We need to take a moment and realize that someday that will be us.

We will be that old lady crossing the street and we will need some help.

I love my grandma. She’s strong and amazing. Whenever we hang out, I have so much fun with her but I also see her struggle.

If we go for a walk, it’s hard for her to keep up. If she drops something and tries to pick it up, she takes minutes to get back up. She was once young like me and she was able to do things faster. She was more than once in a position where an old lady was taking too long to cross the street and she got frustrated about it.

Now, my grandma needs help.

I have to admit, sometimes it’s hard to go out of my way to help others but when I do, I feel good. I know that in some way I changed that person’s day. It doesn’t matter if we help our loved ones or if we help a stranger.

At the end of the day, being kind, compassionate and empathetic is all that matters. Someday we will need that kindness, compassion and empathy from someone else.

This I Believe: APPRECIATE YOUR SCARS

This past semester in English 11, Mrs. Dani DeJong shared a collection of essays from National Public Radio’s program, “This I Believe.” She then challenged her students to write their own personal credo about a core principle that defines their life. The array of topics, concerns, and passions were as diverse as the students themselves.

The ACS Inside Out blog is excited to present their essays in our 2017 summer blog series, “This I Believe: Eight Personal Credos by Eight ACS Students.”

PART FOUR:Appreciate Your Scars

By Stephanie Klassen

When I was younger, I was a bit of a daredevil.

The playground of my elementary school had a tall, rusty, crusty, falling apart, metal slide. Instead of having dirt or bark mulch throughout the playground, my school decided to have rocks. They weren’t sharp rocks, however, they were round, small and grey.

One sunny day, I decided that I would invent a new way of going down the slide. That’s right, I was going to go down the slide on my stomach.

I climbed up the ladder and onto the wooden platform, my classmates looking at me with new found respect. I lay down, pushed off and went flying. My speed picked up so fast I must’ve looked like some sort of super child. When the end of the slide came, I did not slow down. I skid through the rocks hands and face first for about 5 feet leaving a trail of dust and flying rocks behind me. Luckily, my left hand took most of the fall but I ended up shredding open the knuckle on my pinky.

To this day, I still have a scar on my hand and I couldn’t be more proud of it.

I thoroughly enjoy telling the story of how I got my scar and it wasn’t until I was recently telling it that something clicked in my mind.

Our whole lives are made up of stories.

As we live out our lives and make memories, our memories become stories that we tell to describe ourselves. Whenever I tell the story of how I got my scar, people give me a weird look. They look at me as if I am naive for being so proud of it. They hide their judgement behind a smile and a laugh, but their eyes question me and say, “Why are you so happy about something that you should be embarrassed about?” It baffles me to think that people are ashamed of their scars; the scars are just a physical representations of our stories.

If we are so proud of telling our stories, why should we be ashamed if the stories are shown upon our skin?

Although the scars may change our appearance, they can only add to our beauty.

I believe that scars are beautiful.

This I Believe: FROM A CLAY LUMP TO A STATUE

This past semester in English 11, Mrs. Dani DeJong shared a collection of essays from National Public Radio’s program, “This I Believe.” She then challenged her students to write their own personal credo about a core principle that defines their life. The array of topics, concerns, and passions were as diverse as the students themselves.

The ACS Inside Out blog is excited to present their essays in our 2017 summer blog series, “This I Believe: Eight Personal Credos by Eight ACS Students.”

PART THREE: From a Clay Lump to A Statue

by Hailey Flikkema

I was born a lump of clay and throughout my life, people have molded me into the statue I am today.

I was boring, flawed, and lacking form.

I had not yet developed who I was going to be or the morals that drive me.

Each individual that stepped foot into my life, whether for a moment or the entirety, have each added to the end result; the statue that I have become.

When I really contemplated which “artists” have molded me the most, I narrowed it down to three individuals: My mother, my grandmother, and the old lady across the street.

Playful personality

To the untrained eyes of strangers, my mom is a serious person. She is seldom care-free in the eyes of the public.

Personally, I see my mom in a different light; she loves to play. Whether it be dancing like a crazy person in the kitchen while listening to One Direction or spinning on one of those spinning seats in a children’s playground until she falls off, my mom is secretly a free-spirited individual. During every moment of craziness, she emphasized the importance of having people you can be silly with.

My mom molded my character.

Future Surgeon?

I have always been very curious. It should have been no surprise to my grandmother that when I had accidentally killed a frog, I performed “surgery” on it to see what was inside. I found its heart and its brain and was fantastically satisfied with myself by the end. My satisfaction came to an abrupt halt when my granny found out, and to say the least, she was livid.

In her opinion, God made everything, including that tiny little frog who I had now destroyed.

I was so upset with myself that I hid in the bathroom and cried for a while. It was then that I decided to never harm a life again.

My grandmother molded my heart.

Listening to the Lonely

The old lady who resided across the street taught me that every single person on this planet deserves to be listened to. She was quite old when I met her and I was constantly at her house bringing her baked goods or helping her out.

What amazed me about this woman was the fact that she had a story for everything.

It wasn’t until her family moved her to an old age home that I realized the reason she told me so many stories is that she was incredibly lonely. She just wanted to be heard.

The old lady across from my granny’s house molded my ears.

Many have worked on me over my short 17 years of life, and I know there will be many more to come. I’m eternally grateful for those who saw me, a lump, and thought that with some time and effort, I could be amazing.

It isn’t me who decides what kind of statue I will become; it is my artists.

This I Believe: WHERE THE TRAILS HAVE NO NAME

This past semester in English 11, Mrs. Dani DeJong shared a collection of essays from National Public Radio’s program, “This I Believe.” She then challenged her students to write their own personal credo about a core principle that defines their life. The array of topics, concerns, and passions were as diverse as the students themselves.

The ACS Inside Out blog is excited to present their essays in our 2017 summer blog series, “This I Believe: Eight Personal Credos by Eight ACS Students.”

Part Two: Where the Trails have No Name

by Bradley Beukens

It’s important for me for people to know what they stand for and why. Often people can be heavily influenced by others opinions. Their thoughts on politics, relationship advice, farming, even religion, all can waiver on other people pressuring you.

For you to know what you stand for, you need to have time just to collect your thoughts and think for yourself.

My “alone place” is in the mountains, secluded from the busy city life, indulged in God’s wildlife creation. You get a feeling unlike any other realizing how few people have been where you have been, compared to the city life.

Life throws hard balls at you that can leave you in shock or possibly in pain.

This past year, I was faced with a challenge concerning one of my friendships. We would argue and get mad at each other, then we spent some time apart.

In that time, I went on walks and hikes in the mountains and just thought about the situation. Being alone and secluded made me able to think deep about the two sides of the situation. The soothing humming of the stream beside me and the sounds of raindrops falling leaf to leaf never fail to calm my nerves.

Getting away from everything resulting in saving one of my most important friendships; that’s the power of nature.

There are many different ways to worship and build relationship with God. Some people study Scripture to connect with God, some pray for hours on end, some help others in the name of God. These are all great ways to serve and build relationship with.

As of now, my way of feeling God’s presence is in nature. Putting my pulse against nature feels to me that it is against God’s pulse. Getting to explore His handcrafted plants, animals, minerals and knowing that everything was made with the most detail.             

I believe people need to get into the nature God gave to us and find ourselves in it.

 

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